Pathways For All

Pathways for All is a collaborative programme between Right to Succeed, Blackpool Opportunity Area and Educational Diversity.

It aims to support young people identified as most at risk of becoming NEET (not in education, employment or training). This support is targeted at the moment we see the highest dropout rate of post-16 education.

Waiting for the Bus

What is Pathways for All?

Our Pathways for All project in Blackpool takes a collective, research-informed approach to reducing the number of vulnerable young learners who become NEET. To deliver this project, Right to Succeed works with the pupil referral unit, Educational Diversity, and Blackpool and Fylde College, in addition to other providers of post-16 education, employment and training.

How it works

  • Programme partners share their data, allowing us to identify which young people are likely to be “at-risk” of becoming NEET and during which periods of time this risk increases.
  • The students who are considered most “at-risk” of becoming NEET are allocated an Engagement Coach to work with them to support their engagement in Education, Employment and/or Training.
  • Data in Blackpool showed that the most significant period of risk for a young person was in the first six months of post-16 education. With this in mind, Engagement Coaches begin working with year 11 students, establishing relationships before the risk period begins. The continues through year 12, and beyond if necessary.

What do the engagement coaches do? 

Engagement Coaches complete approximately five contact sessions with each young person per term, made up of a combination of: 

  • 1-to-1 sessions
  • Group sessions 
  • Coaching sessions 
  • Visits to colleges or other post-16 providers

The sessions cover: 

  • Getting to know the young person
  • Visioning and planning
  • Individual coaching sessions
  • They may include group coaching on specific skills, as well as campus visits and college/sixth form information sessions depending on the young person’s interests. 

The Engagement Coaches will also be available on results day to support the young people as their results are released.

The intensity of direct support from Engagement Coaches will vary depending on the needs of the young person, any additional pastoral support they may have access to and the assessed risk of their becoming NEET.  

What impact does it have?

For the 2020 cohort of school leavers from the pupil referral unit and two secondary schools, 144 young people were identified as at high risk of becoming NEET.

By December 2020, 70% were in some form of education, training or employment (EET), 15% were working with their Engagement Coaches to move into EET and 9% were not ready for EET so were being supported in other ways, for example linking them to additional mental health support through local programmes and health services.

“Applying for college with two students with cerebral palsy. Really rewarding to see a smile on their face and relief once they have completed an application.” Engagement Coach, Educational Diversity

What is NEET and why is it a problem?

Being NEET refers to young people ages between 16 – 24 who are Not in Education, Employment or Training. Evidence suggests those who remain NEET for a significant period of time have a reduced chance of thriving socially and economically as an adult compared to their peers. 

We know that young people living in areas affected by poverty are the most likely to become NEET for an extended period of time. 

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“Right to Succeed’s research-informed approach is made sustainable through their commitment to harness the power of the collective.”

Sir Harvey McGrath, British business and philanthropy Executive and Right to Succeed funder

Right to Succeed
2019-03-14T14:50:34+00:00

Sir Harvey McGrath, British business and philanthropy Executive and Right to Succeed funder

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“Right to Succeed’s research-informed approach is made sustainable through their commitment to harness the power of the collective.”
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"They have challenged our thinking, provided tools to help us improve our outcomes for young people and remained consistent throughout the process to date."

Head SLT Ed Diversity

Right to Succeed
2019-03-21T20:41:08+00:00

Head SLT Ed Diversity

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"They have challenged our thinking, provided tools to help us improve our outcomes for young people and remained consistent throughout the process to date."
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"It shows me that the work that you are doing is enormously important. You are acting as filters, brokers, and relationship-builders. You are nudging, monitoring and linking the work in the region. You are generating momentum, funding, and enthusiasm."

David Weston CEO at Teacher Development Trust

Right to Succeed
2019-03-21T20:45:45+00:00

David Weston CEO at Teacher Development Trust

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"It shows me that the work that you are doing is enormously important. You are acting as filters, brokers, and relationship-builders. You are nudging, monitoring and linking the work in the region. You are generating momentum, funding, and enthusiasm."
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"After 30 years in this profession and eight years as a Head Teacher I can honestly say that I have never before worked with such professional people who have been able to challenge my thinking and inspire my practice"

Wendy Casson, Headteacher, Educational Diversity Pupil Referral Unit, Blackpool

Right to Succeed
2019-03-21T20:19:42+00:00

Wendy Casson, Headteacher, Educational Diversity Pupil Referral Unit, Blackpool

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"After 30 years in this profession and eight years as a Head Teacher I can honestly say that I have never before worked with such professional people who have been able to challenge my thinking and inspire my practice"
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