Our Journey

Graeme Duncan, our Chief Executive explains:

“I saw the issue of educational inequity up close and personal as a Teach First teacher. The children were amazing, not much younger than I was, but funnier, more resilient, and generally much smarter. But they were mostly born into poverty and attended a school that wasn’t adequate at that time. As a result, they weren’t getting the start in life they needed and few would realise their true potential. That sense of wasted human potential still haunts me.”

We founded the charity in 2015 on the simple notion that we would support schools in places facing significant inequity in educational outcomes to adopt “what works”. But we realised quickly that some schools were able to adopt these interventions very effectively, whilst others would struggle to get the best out of the interventions provided by even our most illustrious and well-evidenced partners. We also realised the most effective work was being done when schools across one place worked together to overcome similar challenges, learning from each other and supporting effective implementation of interventions.
 
Our response has been to understand national and global best practice in delivering place-based change, in order to bring people together across a place to focus on a collective approach to understanding the challenges facing children and young people and implementing change.
 
As we’ve learned and grown in confidence as a charity, the programmes we’ve taken on have grown in scope and scale. We now deliver programmes that address a single theme (generally within education – literacy, inclusion, preventing young people becoming NEET) across a whole local authority/district, or programmes that address cradle to career outcomes for children and young people across a smaller geography, typically the size of 1-2 wards.
 
We are starting to build evidence; learning how this work is most effectively done. We are looking at the impact of leaders, professionals and residents working collectively across a place as we continue to develop as a charity into future. We hope  through learning and development we will soon be able to take on projects covering all children and young people’s outcomes across large geographies. We are far from the finished product, but we pride ourselves on the speed at which we and, more importantly, the communities we serve, are learning to deliver scaled impact.

The answer is simple: a lack of coordinated effort.

That is what Right to Succeed is here to do; to bring together the community, to transform outcomes for young people in a coordinated effort to overcome the issues of inequity affecting young people.

This work is not easy, but the more we’ve done and learned, the more we have become convinced that such a collective approach is the only way we are going to remove the barriers preventing children living in poverty doing well at school and beyond.

.

We are grateful to the many that have supported us on this journey to date and hope you will be encouraged to work with us as we seek to increase impact and learning.

Please see our Working Collectively page for a better look at some of the specific projects that we are currently working on.

Right to Succeed Logo

“Right to Succeed’s research-informed approach is made sustainable through their commitment to harness the power of the collective.”

Sir Harvey McGrath, British business and philanthropy Executive and Right to Succeed funder

Right to Succeed
2019-03-14T14:50:34+00:00

Sir Harvey McGrath, British business and philanthropy Executive and Right to Succeed funder

Right to Succeed Logo
“Right to Succeed’s research-informed approach is made sustainable through their commitment to harness the power of the collective.”
Right to Succeed Logo

"They have challenged our thinking, provided tools to help us improve our outcomes for young people and remained consistent throughout the process to date."

Head SLT Ed Diversity

Right to Succeed
2019-03-21T20:41:08+00:00

Head SLT Ed Diversity

Right to Succeed Logo
"They have challenged our thinking, provided tools to help us improve our outcomes for young people and remained consistent throughout the process to date."
Right to Succeed Logo

"It shows me that the work that you are doing is enormously important. You are acting as filters, brokers, and relationship-builders. You are nudging, monitoring and linking the work in the region. You are generating momentum, funding, and enthusiasm."

David Weston CEO at Teacher Development Trust

Right to Succeed
2019-03-21T20:45:45+00:00

David Weston CEO at Teacher Development Trust

Right to Succeed Logo
"It shows me that the work that you are doing is enormously important. You are acting as filters, brokers, and relationship-builders. You are nudging, monitoring and linking the work in the region. You are generating momentum, funding, and enthusiasm."
Right to Succeed Logo

"After 30 years in this profession and eight years as a Head Teacher I can honestly say that I have never before worked with such professional people who have been able to challenge my thinking and inspire my practice"

Wendy Casson, Headteacher, Educational Diversity Pupil Referral Unit, Blackpool

Right to Succeed
2019-03-21T20:19:42+00:00

Wendy Casson, Headteacher, Educational Diversity Pupil Referral Unit, Blackpool

Right to Succeed Logo
"After 30 years in this profession and eight years as a Head Teacher I can honestly say that I have never before worked with such professional people who have been able to challenge my thinking and inspire my practice"
0
0
Right to Succeed

Find out more about us and what we do, subscribe to our newsletter.